partygirl—oli:

Perspective. The one on the right is modeled after the figure of the average 19 year old female. Looks much better. on We Heart Ithttp://weheartit.com/entry/91836026/via/kendi_randolph

partygirl—oli:

Perspective. The one on the right is modeled after the figure of the average 19 year old female. Looks much better. on We Heart It
http://weheartit.com/entry/91836026/via/kendi_randolph

Reblogged from JUST LET GO
Reblogged from «Bizzle»
kevinolett:

IM INCREDIBLY PROUD OF HER…..

When Keshia Thomas was 18 years old in 1996, the KKK held a rally in her home town of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Hundreds of protesters turned out to tell the white supremacist organization that they were not welcome in the progressive college town. At one point during the event, a man with a SS tattoo and wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with a Confederate flag ended up on the protesters’ side of the fence and a small group began to chase him. He was quickly knocked to the ground and kicked and hit with placard sticks.

As people began to shout, “Kill the Nazi,” the high school student, fearing that mob mentality had taken over, decided to act. Thomas threw herself on top of one of the men she had come to protest, protecting him from the blows. In discussing her motivation after the event, she stated, “Someone had to step out of the pack and say, ‘this isn’t right’… I knew what it was like to be hurt. The many times that that happened, I wish someone would have stood up for me… violence is violence - nobody deserves to be hurt, especially not for an idea.”

Thomas never heard from the man after that day but months later, a young man came up to her to say thanks, telling her that the man she had protected was his father. For Thomas, learning that he had a son brought even greater significance to her heroic act. As she observed, “For the most part, people who hurt… they come from hurt. It is a cycle. Let’s say they had killed him or hurt him really bad. How does the son feel? Does he carry on the violence?”

Mark Brunner, the student photographer who took this now famous photograph, added that what was so remarkable was who Thomas saved: “She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her. Who does that in this world?” 

And, in response to those who argued that the man deserved a beating or more, Pulitzer Prize-winning commentator Leonard Pitts Jr. offered this short reflection in The Miami Herald: “That some in Ann Arbor have been heard grumbling that she should have left the man to his fate, only speaks of how far they have drifted from their own humanity. And of the crying need to get it back.
Keshia’s choice was to affirm what they have lost.
Keshia’s choice was human.
Keshia’s choice was hope.”

To view more pictures of this Mighty Girl’s remarkable act of courage and read more about the event, visit the BBC at http://bbc.in/1djDOGY

For stories for children and teens about real-life girls and women who took a stand for what they believed in, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Role Model” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/biography

For both fictional and biographical books for children and teens that star courageous girls and women, visit our “Courage / Bravery” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/values?cat=218

For Mighty Girl stories that explore racial discrimination and prejudice, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/books/social-issues/prejudice-discrimination?cat=71

kevinolett:

IM INCREDIBLY PROUD OF HER…..

When Keshia Thomas was 18 years old in 1996, the KKK held a rally in her home town of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Hundreds of protesters turned out to tell the white supremacist organization that they were not welcome in the progressive college town. At one point during the event, a man with a SS tattoo and wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with a Confederate flag ended up on the protesters’ side of the fence and a small group began to chase him. He was quickly knocked to the ground and kicked and hit with placard sticks.

As people began to shout, “Kill the Nazi,” the high school student, fearing that mob mentality had taken over, decided to act. Thomas threw herself on top of one of the men she had come to protest, protecting him from the blows. In discussing her motivation after the event, she stated, “Someone had to step out of the pack and say, ‘this isn’t right’… I knew what it was like to be hurt. The many times that that happened, I wish someone would have stood up for me… violence is violence - nobody deserves to be hurt, especially not for an idea.”

Thomas never heard from the man after that day but months later, a young man came up to her to say thanks, telling her that the man she had protected was his father. For Thomas, learning that he had a son brought even greater significance to her heroic act. As she observed, “For the most part, people who hurt… they come from hurt. It is a cycle. Let’s say they had killed him or hurt him really bad. How does the son feel? Does he carry on the violence?”

Mark Brunner, the student photographer who took this now famous photograph, added that what was so remarkable was who Thomas saved: “She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her. Who does that in this world?” 

And, in response to those who argued that the man deserved a beating or more, Pulitzer Prize-winning commentator Leonard Pitts Jr. offered this short reflection in The Miami Herald: “That some in Ann Arbor have been heard grumbling that she should have left the man to his fate, only speaks of how far they have drifted from their own humanity. And of the crying need to get it back.
Keshia’s choice was to affirm what they have lost.
Keshia’s choice was human.
Keshia’s choice was hope.”

To view more pictures of this Mighty Girl’s remarkable act of courage and read more about the event, visit the BBC at http://bbc.in/1djDOGY

For stories for children and teens about real-life girls and women who took a stand for what they believed in, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Role Model” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/biography

For both fictional and biographical books for children and teens that star courageous girls and women, visit our “Courage / Bravery” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/personal-development/values?cat=218

For Mighty Girl stories that explore racial discrimination and prejudice, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/books/social-issues/prejudice-discrimination?cat=71

Reblogged from Empowered
Reblogged from This Guy...

promptsgalore:

Write a five-paragraph biography of yourself from the perspective of an inanimate object you’ve had your entire life.

Reblogged from Write Now
Reblogged from sweet nothings
Reblogged from Mi mundo
Reblogged from Gallifrey
thefizzinyourcup:

This. 

You always want what you don’t have because you don’t understand what is hard in others life.

People always say to me “I want ginger hair”
I say “yeah now that your out of high school you do, try growing up with it your whole life.”


“When you are a ginger live is pretty hard,
The years of ritual bullying in the school yard.
And kids calling you Ranger and Fanta Pants,
No invitation to the High School dance.”

thefizzinyourcup:

This.

You always want what you don’t have because you don’t understand what is hard in others life.

People always say to me “I want ginger hair”
I say “yeah now that your out of high school you do, try growing up with it your whole life.”


“When you are a ginger live is pretty hard,
The years of ritual bullying in the school yard.
And kids calling you Ranger and Fanta Pants,
No invitation to the High School dance.”